[日本語]

Dianne Hammond studied Japanese and journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After graduating she worked at the Embassy of Japan in Washington, DC, as the congressional affairs assistant for two years. She currently works at TogoRun, a healthcare PR firm. Dianne likes to travel and has visited Europe and Southeast Asia, including three separate trips to Japan. She hopes that her next trip abroad will take her to China, Japan and Malaysia.


Dianne and her Japanese teacher Seiko in Fukuoka, Japan

Between Black and White: Reflections on Japan’s Diversity
By Dianne Hammond

I used to believe that Japan was as homogeneous as a society could be. After all, close to 98% of the population is ethnic Japanese. Japanese culture also emphasizes the group rather than the individual, which tends to mask differences between people. On my first two-week trip to Japan when I was 15, I looked around and couldn’t see past the matching school uniforms.

However, several years later on a college study abroad program, the more time I spent in Japan, what struck me was not how similar everyone was to each other, but how different. I lived in Nagoya, Japan, from September 2005 through May 2006 and attended Nanzan University. I lived with a Japanese host family, the Dannos, for the entire nine months. While I was faced with a different set of challenges than that of my peers staying in foreign student dormitories, such as the necessity of negotiating curfew and dinner arrangements, the Dannos were patient with me, and I learned more Japanese living there than in all of my classes combined.

I also got to know the innermost quirks of an unusual family. I was the 18th student the Dannos had hosted, so they were quite comfortable around foreigners. My host mother, Takako, was a stay-at-home housewife who hated to cook and clean so we ate out most nights. My host sister Reina, who was 26 at the time, still lived at home and was an ‘office lady’ by day and a musician and new age spiritualist by night. My host father worked at Toyota but seemed to spend the majority of his days at home, which was atypical of the workaholic ‘salary man’ stereotype.

As I got to know my host family and Japanese classmates, Japanese culture began to seem a lot less black and white. Everyone had a story about what made them different, and they were eager to share. For example, the first thing a classmate said when I met him was that he was of partial Korean descent, and could I tell? Another classmate had grown up in England where her father was a diplomat and spoke English with a heavy British accent. A girl who grew to be a close friend touted the regional cuisine and festivals of her hometown in Kyushu and invited me to stay with her family over winter break so I could see for myself.

Even as I became more aware of the nuanced variations among Japanese people and customs, I was also surprised to discover that Nagoya is home to so many Brazilian, Chinese and Korean workers and immigrants. Whenever I traveled outside of Japan, I had to first visit Nagoya’s immigration office to apply for a re-entry visa. The office was always packed with people speaking a variety of languages. On one of those visits I met Michel, a Brazilian immigrant who was excited to speak English with me and take a break from trying to learn Japanese. My impression was that economic reasons brought him to Japan, but he was not finding it easy to fit in and make Japan feel like home. I could understand how it could be discouraging living in a country and feeling unwelcome. My host mother, for one, sometimes voiced her opinion that these foreign immigrants were to blame for a recent rise in crime.

Her opinion was just one in an ongoing immigration debate that Japan is struggling with. A recent Washington Post article explored the challenges faced by immigrants trying to stay in Japan long-term, why Japan may need to boost its immigrant labor force if it expects to maintain its current economic vitality, and the difficulties faced by lawmakers who hope to make a change in Japan’s immigration policy.

Japan’s population is expected to fall from 127 million to below 100 million in the next 45 years, meaning that Japan will have to look to immigrants to boost their declining workforce. Even though Prime Minister Naoto Kan recently outlined a plan toward easing immigration regulations and doubling the number of foreign workers in the next 10 years, widespread opposition to the plan makes it difficult to implement. The majority of Japanese people oppose accepting more immigrants to maintain economic vitality for a variety of reasons. However, the future of Japan’s economic success may very well depend on that mindset to change.

I’ve seen that Japanese society already has the capacity to celebrate individual differences. I think that cultural awareness programs like Bound in Japan will help give a much needed voice to immigrants and allow them to express why they are making Japan their new home. It looks as though their numbers will only increase in the coming years, and it may be essential to Japan’s economic vitality that they be accepted and welcomed.


ダイアン・ハモンドはウィスコンシン大学マディソン校で日本語とジャーナリズムを学び、卒業後はワシントンDCの在米国日本大使館で議会班のアシスタントとして2年間務めました。現在は、ヘルスケア関連のPR会社であるTogoRunで働いています。ダイアンは旅行が好きで、これまで、ヨーロッパと東南アジアを訪ねたほか、日本も3度訪問しました。次の海外旅行には中国と日本とマレーシアを訪ねることを考えています。

白と黒の間で:日本の多様性について考える
原著: ダイアン・ハモンド (翻訳: 岡崎詩織)

私は以前、日本はこれ以上ないくらい同一化された社会だと思っていました。全人口の98%近くが日本民族ですし、個人よりグループを尊重する風習があり、個性が隠されてしまうこともあります。私が15歳で初めて日本を訪問し、2週間滞在したときには、同年代の人がみんな着ている、お揃いの学生の制服ばかりが目につきました。

しかし、数年後、私が大学の留学プログラムでもう一度日本を訪れたときは、日本に長くいればいるほど、周りの人がいかに似通っているかではなく、いかに違うかということに気づき始めました。私は2005年9月から2006年5月まで南山大学に通い、その9ヶ月間はずっと、名古屋でホームステイをしていました。留学生のための寮にいるクラスメートと違い、門限や夕食の時間を日本語で交渉する必要はあったものの、壇野家という名の私のホストファミリーは非常に忍耐強く、優しい家族でした。彼らとともに過ごした時間は、どんな授業よりもよく、日本での暮らしについていろいろと教えてくれました。

壇野家では、少し変わった家庭での生活を楽しむことができました。私はそこでホームステイをした18人目の留学生だったので、彼らは外国人と接することによく慣れていました。私のホスト・マザー、タカコさんは料理や掃除が嫌いな専業主婦だったため、私たちは殆ど毎晩外食しました。ホスト・シスターのレイナさんは当時26歳で、まだ実家に住んでおり、日中はOL、夜はミュージシャン兼ニュー・エイジ活動家でした。私のホスト・ファーザーはトヨタで働いていましたが、一日の大半を家で過ごしているようで、働き尽くめのいわゆる「サラリーマン」のイメージとはかけ離れていました。

私がホスト・ファミリーやクラスメートを知っていくにつれ、日本文化はどんどん、白黒がはっきりしなくなっていきました。みな、自分がなぜ周りと違うのかについて話したがりました。たとえば、クラスメートの一人は、私と初対面にもかかわらず、自分は韓国人の血を引いているが、見て分かるか? と聞いてきました。別のクラスメートは、父親が外交官であったことからイギリスで育ち、強いイギリス訛りの英語を話しました。後に私の親友となったまた別の少女は、自分の故郷である九州の郷土料理や祭りについてしきりに自慢し、経験してみるのが一番、と冬休みに私を実家に呼んでくれました。

日本の人や風習の微妙な違いについて少しずつ学びながらも驚いたのは、名古屋にブラジル人、中国人、韓国人など、さまざまな国から来た労働者や移民が住んでいることでした。日本を出るたび、名古屋の移民局に行って再入国のビザを申請しなければならなかったのですが、移民局はいつも混雑し、いろいろな言語を話す人でいっぱいでした。ある日そこで、私はミシェルというブラジル人の移民に出会いました。彼は日本語会話の練習に疲れていたらしく、私と英語で話す機会を喜びました。私の印象では彼は、金銭的な理由から日本に来たものの、日本にいまいち馴染めなかったのだと思います。外国に住みながらも地元の人に歓迎されないという孤独な気持ちは、私もよく分かりました。こういった外国人の移民が日本の犯罪率を増加させている、とホスト・マザーが時折口にしているのを聞いていたのです。

私のホスト・マザーの意見は、日本が現在取り組んでいる、移民に関するさまざまな議論の一つでしかありません。最近書かれたこのワシントン・ポストの記事は、日本に長期滞在しようとする移民たちの挑戦、日本の移民政策を改善しようとしている法律家たちの挑戦などについて語り、日本が経済的な強さを維持するためになぜ移民の労働力を増加させる必要があるのかを説いています。

日本の人口は、45年後には1億2700万人から1億人に減ると思われています。これはつまり、減っていく労働力を補うため、日本は移民に頼らなければならないということです。菅総理は最近、移民制限を緩和し、外国人労働者を今後10年で2倍に増やす、という政策を発表しましたが、国民の大反対にあい、施行は難しくなっています。日本人の大半が、さまざまな理由から、経済的活力を保つためにもっと多くの移民を受け入れるということに反対しているのです。日本経済の未来は、この考えが変わるか否かにかかっている可能性が高いにもかかわらず。

日本社会は個人の違いを尊重することができることを、私は自分の目で見て確信しました。「バウンド・イン・ジャパン」のように文化的意識を高める企画は、移民たちに声を与え、なぜ日本を新しい故郷として選んだのか、発表の場を与えると思います。今後は、移民は増えていく一方だと思えますし、彼らが日本に受け入れられ、歓迎されることは、日本の経済的活力のためには欠かせないことなのかもしれません。