ストーリー[日本語]

I lived in Japan for three years, and during that time, my roots reached deep into the community and my heartstrings far across the landscape. Even now, every time I return to Japan, it feels like coming home. My friends greet me, the sights and sounds wash over me, and I slip into the daily rhythms of life there, different yet familiar and comfortable.

It has made me curious. What if I choose life in Japan–permanently? In a country where non-native residents account for less than 2% of the population, what kind of support would I receive? What kind of home would Japan be?

As a second generation Asian American, I have witnessed my parents’ struggles in a new homeland and experienced the challenges of growing up at the intersection of different cultures. Even so, growing up in the United States whose history reads as a story of immigration and diversity, I have taken much for granted. The United States has long been seen as a haven and land of opportunity for many immigrants. Japan, however, has rarely embraced newcomers completely into the heart of society.

Unless Japan intends to close its doors to all foreigners, this orientation should be re-evaluated. Non-native residents contribute to Japanese society and deserve more consideration as equal members of this society. In this regard, a deeper understanding of the non-native community and increased interaction between non-native residents and local Japanese are essential to productive discourse.

I saw this as an opportunity to apply my love of book art and community outreach to highlight an issue near to my heart. This innovative approach became the seed that blossomed into Bound in Japan.

This project is dedicated to all the people of Japan, Japanese and non-native residents alike, as well as the people who like myself, whether we acutally live there or not, consider it home.


私は日本に3年間住んでいたことがあります。日本にいる間、私はコミュニティーに深く根ざし、心の琴線は景色の遥か彼方まで伸びていくかのようでした。今でも日本に訪れるたびに、まるで故郷に帰ってきたかのような気持ちになります。友人たちが声をかけてくれ、親しみのある風景と音が心に打ち寄せ、自分の国とは異なるけど馴染みがあって心地良い日常生活のリズムにすんなり溶け込んでしまうのです。

そして、私は考えたのです。もし私が日本に“永久に”住むことを選んだらどうなるのだろうか、と。非日本人居住者が人口の2%にも満たないこの国では、どのようなサポートをうけられるのか、そして日本は私にとってどのような住処となりえるのだろうか、と。

私はアジア系アメリカ人の二世であることから、両親が新たな祖国として選んだ土地で苦労するのを目の当たりにし、自分が異なる文化の狭間で育つことの複雑さを経験してきました。それでも、移民と多様性の歴史で成り立つ米国で育ったため、自分にとって当たり前だったことが実はとても恵まれていたことに気づきました。米国は長い間、多くの移民にとって、新天地であり、様々な機会の与えられる国として認識されてきましたが、日本では外からやってきた人々を社会の中核に完全に迎え入れるのは稀ではないでしょうか。

日本が今後は外国人を全く受け入れないという状況にならないのなら、この現状は見直されるべきではないでしょうか。非日本人居住者は日本社会に貢献しており、社会における対等な存在として考慮されるべきでしょう。そのためには、非日本人居住者への深い理解と彼らと日本人の触れ合いが有益な対話に不可欠なのです。

そこで私は、この自分が思い入れを感じる問題に、ブックアートとコミュニティー活動への自分の情熱を共に生かせないかと考えたのです。そのユニークな発想が元となり、バウンド・イン・ジャパンの構想へと発展しました。

このプロジェクトは、日本人と非日本人居住者を含む全ての日本に住む人たち、そして私のように実際には住んでいなくても日本を故郷と捉えている人々に捧げられるものです。

THE ARTIST   アーティスト[日本語]

Thien-Kieu Lam was born in Louisiana and currently resides in the Washington, DC area. Before Washington, DC, Kieu lived in Kagoshima, Japan, for three years as a participant of the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program. Besides teaching English, she also worked with a senior high school art club and shared her love of art and book arts with the local community.

Kieu is actively involved with Pyramid Atlantic Art Center in Silver Spring, Maryland, and is a coordinator for the 2010 11th Biennial Pyramid Atlantic Book Arts Fair and Conference. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, where she studied photography and book arts. Kieu speaks Japanese, Mandarin, and Vietnamese.

ティエンキュウ・ラムは米国ルイジアナ州に生まれ、現在はワシントンDCに住んでいます。それ以前はJETプログラムの参加者として鹿児島県に住んでいました。英語を教える傍ら、キュウは高校の美術部の活動にも関わり、アートやブックアートへの想いを地域の人々に伝いました。

キュウはメリーランド州のシルバースプリングにあるピラミッド・アトランティック・アートセンターにおいて精力的に活動しており、2010年に行われる第11回ピラミッド・アトランティック・ブックアートフェア(隔年開催)のコーディネーターの一人です。学生時代は、ミズーリ州セントルイスのワシントン大学でフォトグラフィーとブックアートを学びました。キュウは英語に加えて日本語、中国語、ベトナム語を話します。

PROJECT プロジェクト    
PEOPLE

ART アート
ARTIST’S STORY ストーリー
BLOG ブログ